• Pet Care Veterinary Clinic
  • Pet Care Veterinary Clinic

VACCINATIONS:

Rabies and Parvo are deadly diseases caused by viruses.  Rabies attacks the nervous system while Parvo attacks the digestive system.  

RABIES:

Rabies affects only mammals.  Reptiles, fish, and birds cannot contract rabies.  Rabies is most common in wild animals.  Any exposure to wild animals can put your pet at risk if they have not received their rabies vaccination.  You should report any suspicious looking animals to your local animal control service.  Signs to look for include:

  • Fearfulness

  • Aggression

  • Excessive Drooling

  • Difficulty Swallowing

  • Staggering

  • Seizures

If your pet has been bitten by a wild animal, your pet will need to have another rabies vaccine administered immediately, even if their vaccinations are current. 

Source:  American Veterinary Medical Association

CANINE DISTEMPER/PARVO:

While commonly called canine distemper vaccination, this vaccine typically protects your pet against more than just distemper. That’s because it is actually a combination of vaccines in one injection that will protect your pet from several serious diseases.

Canine distemper is considered a core vaccine. This means that, because canine distemper is a serious, highly contagious disease with a high death rate, organized veterinary medicine has determined that all dogs should be protected from this disease.

The exact combination of your dog’s distemper combination vaccine depends on your dog’s age and individual disease-risk profile, but in general, the most important diseases to protect against are canine distemper, canine adenovirus-2 infection (hepatitis and respiratory disease), canine parvovirus infection, and parainfluenza. The abbreviation for this combination vaccine is frequently written as “DHPPV,” “DHPP,” “DA2PP,” or “DA2PPV” on your pet’s health records. The letters in these abbreviations are defined as follows:

  • D = Canine distemper virus. Infection with this virus is serious, with a death rate approaching 50% in untreated dogs. The virus attacks the respiratory, digestive, and brain/nervous systems of dogs.

  • H = Hepatitis. Since this vaccine protects against canine adenovirus-2 and adenovirus-1, it is often referred to as A2. Canine adenovirus-1 causes canine infectious hepatitis, a serious disease that affects the liver.

  • Canine adenovirus-2 causes respiratory disease and is one of the infectious agents commonly associated with canine infectious tracheobronchitis, also known as kennel cough.

  • A2 = Canine adenovirus-2. This virus causes a respiratory disease in dogs (see above).

  • P = Parvovirus. Infection with this virus is highly contagious and serious, with a death rate approaching 90% in untreated dogs. The virus attacks the digestive and immune systems of unvaccinated animals, causing debilitating diarrhea and vomiting.

  • P = Parainfluenza. This is a mild respiratory viral disease in dogs. V = Virus.

Therefore, a notation of “DA2PPV,” “DA2PP,” “DHPP,” or “DHPPV” in your pet’s vaccination record generally means that your pet was vaccinated against canine distemper, hepatitis (canine adenovirus-2 and -1), parvovirus, and parainfluenza.

Source:  VetStreet.com November 27, 2011

BORDETELLA/BRONCHISEPTICA:

Bordetella bronchiseptica is a bacterium that causes respiratory disease in dogs. It is one of the most common bacterial causes of canine infectious tracheobronchitis, which is also sometimes called kennel cough. Bordetella is highly contagious, easily transmitted through direct contact or the air, and resistant to destruction in the environment. While not considered to be core, Bordetella vaccination may be recommended for dogs whose lifestyle places them at greater risk of contracting the disease. This includes dogs that are boarded frequently or that regularly visit grooming parlors or dog parks. Based on your dog’s risk for exposure, your veterinarian may recommend vaccinating your dog against Bordetella in addition to administering the canine distemper combination vaccine.

Source:  VetStreet.com November 27, 2011